The Avenues Bicycle Project Recycling bicycles across Hull and the East Riding of  Yorkshire

This website was last updated on 24 March, 2017

Reg. Charity Number 1163510


People and Their Bikes

January 2017: 20 students and farmers attend a VBP  one day workshop training, each one of them benefit​ing ​ from a ​Hull and East Riding ​bicycle. They all live at Makomp village where transportation has been a big problem for them. Farmers walk every day to their farm and students walk every day to school. But now their life has been made easier because of their bicycles.

​February 2017: A one day workshop training at Binkoloh village which is located in the northern part of Sierra Leone. 40 boys and girls attended the training and, again, each one them benefited from a​ Hull and East Riding​ bicycle. Transportation has been a big problem for the young people of Binkoloh village as they have had to walk 6 miles everyday to and from school.  ​These bicycles ​from the bike project in Hull  have really put a smile on the faces of these young people, as you can see in the photograph.

Saturday, April 2nd, 2016: The Village Bicycle Project ran a bike maintenance workshop in the village of Kamabai, Sierra Leone using Hull and East Yorkshire bikes. Here you can see young people celebrating with their bikes after the completion of the bike repair workshop and before they took their new bikes home with them.











Here is Fatama learning how to check wheel bearings. By the end of the workshop she had learned to identify small problems on her bike so that they can be fixed before they become big problems. She also learned how to use tools to make basic repairs and adjustments. VBP sometimes run women only workshops so that the women can feel free to learn about their bicycles.


Sunday, April 3rd, 2016: There was a road race from Lunsar to Freetown, and you can see young men on the start line with some of our donated vintage road bikes, sent in our 2016 shipment. Karim Kamara, our VBP colleague in Sierra Leone, has asked if we have any more road bikes as he is particularly keen to get more young people involved in road racing. By the way, on the end of the line up is Deborah, who holds the women's record for the Lunsar to Freetown race.

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The Avenues Bicycle Project

188 Westbourne Avenue

Kingston upon Hull HU5 3JB

Tel. 07715 307942

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The Village Bicycle Project began distributing our 2012 shipment of bikes in Ghana in January 2013.  They ran a number of bicycle maintenance workshops in Northern Techiman and the following stories are from people who attended workshops in the village of Mangoase.


Aduowa is 15 and lives in Akonknoti - about 4 kms south east of Mangoase.  Aduowa’s family have a small farm in Mangoase, and it was her father who enrolled her in the bicycle programme - which he knew about since The Village Bicycle Project had previously had workshops in Akonkonti.  Aduowa is still in Junior High School and hopes to complete next year before attending Senior High School in Buoyem, which is 8 or 9 kms south of Akonkonti.  Asked what she learnt in the workshop - she said this was the first time she’d ever repaired a puncture.

Peter is 21 and left school after completing his Junior High education to help his parents on the farm in Mangoase.  He grows maize, which was being harvested at the time of the bicycle workshop, just before the rains were due in January.  The maize is collected in a truck, which the family rents with many other families, and the produce is moved to Wenchi for market.  Peter said that The Village Bicycle Project workshop taught him about tyre pressure … which he didn’t know was so important.

Nana (a name usually reserved for the palace, though he’s not a chief) came to The Village Bicycle Project to replace his old bicycle which he’s had for many years.  He said that as you get older, you have to attend more funerals.  He said that the workshop module about bearings was very interesting, and that he would check them every day to make sure they were not starting to ‘shake’.